juliet: Climate Camp logo: 3 tripods with banners, very colourful (climate camp)
So, if you fancy a trip to Edinburgh this summer, or indeed if you already *are* in Edinburgh this summer.... presenting





Camp for Climate Action 2010
Break the Bank!
Edinburgh


Four days of training and direct action: 21st–24th August

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MusyfeMcnVw


The Camp for Climate Action is a grassroots movement taking direct action against the root causes of climate change. We've already had major successes in stopping Heathrow's third runway and E.ON's plans for a new coal fired power station at Kingsnorth.

This year we're targeting the Royal Bank of Scotland, one of the world's largest investors in oil, gas and coal.

Last year RBS were bailed out with £50 billion of public money. From tar sands extraction in Canada to coal infrastructure here in the UK, we're paying to trash our future. These projects are not just causing catastrophic climate change, but destroying the lives and livelihoods of people across the globe. Meanwhile, we're told there is no money left in the public pot and we should be braced for decades of public sectors cuts.

What are we doing about it? In August, people from across the UK will be converging to take back the power and Break the Bank! Our sustainable and collectively organised basecamp will give you the chance to learn, train up, and meet like minded individuals. Exciting action plans are also underway for those who want to get involved.

So come to Edinburgh this summer! We'll see you there.

More information at the Climate Camp website.



(also we have a kickass accessibility statement this year, hurrah.)
juliet: (australia - kata tjuta)
This is another of those bits-and-pieces updates.

I went to Glastonbury! I really am going to write a proper post about this (possibly when I have sorted the photos out & put them on Flickr) so I will restrict myself here to saying: SUNNY. ALL OF THE SUNSHINE. Awesomeness.

Sidney spent the week of Glastonbury with my parents, where she had a splendid time charging round their local park (far superior to ours, being about 4 times the size and containing a river, in which Sid accidentally went swimming), trying to drink from the sprinkler, and waking up far too early. She then came back and behaved like a total brat for about a week, culminating in dragging down and eating the head of Superted, my teddybear. (I've had him since I was 2, and [personal profile] doop brought him out to Australia for me last year.) I was *seriously* livid and very upset, but I've found a toy hospital who specialise in repairing damaged elderly bears, and for now he's tacked back together and bandaged up while he's on their waiting list. Sid has been behaving much better since. [sigh]

I have had a couple of stories accepted by non-paying venues, which is very pleasing. I will update you all when they come out! Possibly also other good news on this front, but I am waiting to talk about that for now (jinx issues).

I spent this last weekend at an *awesome* workshop on consensus decision-making and facilitation of same, run by Seeds for Change. Inspiring, informative, and bloody knackering. Plus I got to meet some really cool people, and hang out with some whom I'd already met. They're doing an advanced version in Oxford in October, which I'm seriously considering going to.

The Balcony Book meanders onwards (onto month 7 now already!); other sorts of work continue to occur; financial destitution continues to be staved off. I was entertained to read this blog by someone who's given up buying new clothes -- this year I have bought precisely one new clothe (a fair-trade cotton dress, at Glastonbury) and one second-hand clothe (a v nice tunic top thingy). I suppose this probably is partly due to my wish to reduce my carbon footprint ekt ekt (i.e. I continue to endeavour not to buy stuff, in general), but mostly it's just due to financial prudence. Clothes or (e)books? The reading matter has it, every time.
juliet: Climate Camp logo: 3 tripods with banners, very colourful (climate camp)
A handful of Climate Camp protestors (inc several people I know!) occupied the lobby of Edelman, E.On's PR company, on Tuesday. (E.On are the company who want to build a new coal-fired power station at Kingsnorth. And I think elsewhere as well.)

Video of the protest.
Video response made last night to Edelman's post-event attempts at spin.
juliet: (get an allotment)
One of the things that made the lovely tipi at Waveform lovely was that it came with a bunch of sheepskin rugs. Which are totally the business when it comes to keeping you warm when sitting on the ground: they're thick, insulating, and unlike e.g. cotton don't feel damp when it's cold. However: not very vegan (not even vegetarian, really).

Which gave rise to another bout of my ongoing internal debate about the use of materials like leather and wool, and their alternatives.

The argument against wool is animal cruelty - although sheep aren't killed for their wool (obviously), there are issues of mistreatment with large-scale production. (Bottom line is: large-scale commercial production of anything is more or less guaranteed to be bad for most people, animals, and land involved.) However: there are increasingly large numbers of people producing organic wool from well-kept, well-cared-for animals. Ecologically speaking, if you are keeping sheep in, say, Wales, then there's really not a lot else that's useful that you could be doing with that land. Growing wool on it is, if done right, environmentally fine, and efficient.

The alternative non-animal based substances are cotton, and various artificial fibres that are all petrochemical based. Petrochemicals are, I'm pretty sure, environmentally worse than wool (& wool will probably last longer). Cotton is difficult to buy organic, and even if you do buy organic there are still monoculture issues. And textile-miles issues.

With leather: obviously, involves dead animals. But lasts better than non-animal alternatives (even if fake leather is a lot better than it used to be), and again has, or can have, less environmental impact. Although I haven't really seen leather around that has organic or good-husbandry labels on. I don't need new shoes in the foreseeable, but when I do, should I be thinking about going back to leather?

It comes down, of course, to the fact that moral decisions are complicated, and different moral issues don't necessarily run side by side. You have to decide what weighting you give to them and act accordingly. At the moment the thing I want to prioritise is "consume less", so the immediate solution to these issues is not to buy any of the options (I want to do some more sewing soon, but I'm going to see what I can use from my fabric stash, or go charity-shop hunting for things to repurpose, rather than buy more fabric of whatever sort. Similarly I'm still up to my eyebrows in yarn stash.). It's an ongoing consideration for the future, though.
juliet: (get an allotment)
One of the things that made the lovely tipi at Waveform lovely was that it came with a bunch of sheepskin rugs. Which are totally the business when it comes to keeping you warm when sitting on the ground: they're thick, insulating, and unlike e.g. cotton don't feel damp when it's cold. However: not very vegan (not even vegetarian, really).

Which gave rise to another bout of my ongoing internal debate about the use of materials like leather and wool, and their alternatives.

The argument against wool is animal cruelty - although sheep aren't killed for their wool (obviously), there are issues of mistreatment with large-scale production. (Bottom line is: large-scale commercial production of anything is more or less guaranteed to be bad for most people, animals, and land involved.) However: there are increasingly large numbers of people producing organic wool from well-kept, well-cared-for animals. Ecologically speaking, if you are keeping sheep in, say, Wales, then there's really not a lot else that's useful that you could be doing with that land. Growing wool on it is, if done right, environmentally fine, and efficient.

The alternative non-animal based substances are cotton, and various artificial fibres that are all petrochemical based. Petrochemicals are, I'm pretty sure, environmentally worse than wool (& wool will probably last longer). Cotton is difficult to buy organic, and even if you do buy organic there are still monoculture issues. And textile-miles issues.

With leather: obviously, involves dead animals. But lasts better than non-animal alternatives (even if fake leather is a lot better than it used to be), and again has, or can have, less environmental impact. Although I haven't really seen leather around that has organic or good-husbandry labels on. I don't need new shoes in the foreseeable, but when I do, should I be thinking about going back to leather?

It comes down, of course, to the fact that moral decisions are complicated, and different moral issues don't necessarily run side by side. You have to decide what weighting you give to them and act accordingly. At the moment the thing I want to prioritise is "consume less", so the immediate solution to these issues is not to buy any of the options (I want to do some more sewing soon, but I'm going to see what I can use from my fabric stash, or go charity-shop hunting for things to repurpose, rather than buy more fabric of whatever sort. Similarly I'm still up to my eyebrows in yarn stash.). It's an ongoing consideration for the future, though.

August 2017

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