linky linky

Apr. 8th, 2010 09:51 pm
juliet: Tiny baby shoot of rhubarb (baby rhubarb!)

Just to get rid of open FF tabs again...

ION: have had a lovely fortnight's holiday in, variously, Northern Ireland, and Boston (Lincolnshire, not the other one); of that latter, more anon. Now I am back in London & surprisingly busy for someone whose work is only full-time in the loosest possible sense (i.e. that sense in which it is the only thing that I am doing in the paid work line, rather than any sense in which I actually work an approximation to what this society considers to be full-time hours. I like it very much this way.). The dog continues to be adorable, time-consuming, and an agent of chaos. And it is spring properly today ftb I wore my sandals to the park. Down with proper shoes! Also the first tiny asparagus shoots are appearing in the allotment.

juliet: Avatar of me with blue hair & jeans (blue hair jeans avatar)
It occurred to me after ConFest last weekend that I didn't see anywhere (on the tickets, on the programme thingy, anywhere else) any acknowledgement to the traditional owners of the land. This struck me (although I confess to not noticing it at the time), because that acknowledgement is something I have seen at most official/governmental establishments (including museums and suchlike), and also something I saw at Exodus, the other festival I've been to in Australia (psytrancery). There wasn't (as, again, there was at Exodus) as far as I could see (and I did look for this) any explicit involvement of the traditional owners. Given the hippy/alternative/etc background of ConFest, the omission surprises (and saddens) me.

This also links to my discomfort with what felt like not just cultural appropriation, but fairly incompetent cultural appropriation, at one of the workshops I went to[0]. Lots of banging on about 'traditional medicine wheels' and 'tribes' and 'Father Sun' and a whole lot of similar stuff. Now, I am aware that making assumptions about people's cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds based on appearance is very dodgy, so yes, it's possible that the two leaders of the workshop were screwing around with their own cultural background. They didn't make any claim to that, though, and if that was the case, I still think they were doing it in a very dubious fashion. (It *sounded* very like random mix-&-match wet liberal hippy nonsense, with which I am depressingly familiar, and it didn't match up with anything I have learnt about the way the culture of the Indigneous peoples here works.)

Unfortunately, of course, this isn't that unusual; liberal/alternative/etc != aware of this shit. And when chatting to a couple of people involved with the organising co-op (about totally unrelated matters), I was struck by what seemed like a fairly aggressive attitude, and not all that much self- or other-awareness :-/ (Some of which I tried to challenge a bit, but, hm. With I think maybe limited success, and I'm not good at pushing, especially given the social context of the conversation.)

[0] I should note that I did actually get some useful stuff from the workshops; but I was uncomfortable with the way they packaged it up.
juliet: (grrrr)
Climate Camp legal team report on the policing of the 24 hr G20 camp. There's a decent summary in the first couple of pages if you don't want to read all of it.

Warning: the witness accounts in Appendix 3 are distressing in places: police violently attacking and threatening peaceful protesters.

(The legal-notebook-based timeline that they have in there is interesting.)
juliet: (grrrr)
What happened when the police broke (illegally) into the RamPART Centre in E London (features tasers & the police stealing people's phones, among other things).

The phone thing goes: "Is this your phone?" "Yes." "Prove it or we'll nick you for stealing it." It's a tactic to get people's names & addresses, basically (because you are not obliged to provide a name & address when stopped-and-searched). I've witnessed (at Climate Camp last summer) other similar tactics to get names, including taking cards out of a wallet and reading them (also illegal under stop-&-search legislation), reading notebooks (ditto), and some truly outrageous racial discrimination while I was doing my legal-observer thing, where an Italian guy was threatened with arrest under the Immigration Act unless he provided name, address, and *his landlord's phone number*, whereupon they *phoned the landlord*. So, yeah, I'm furious and saddened, but not surprised.

(RampART link)
juliet: (round the world)
(Disclaimer in advance: this following is largely speculation/rambling on my part based on very little direct experience and similarly little information. Factual correction more than welcome, as well as any other thoughts generally.)

Also it got a bit long )

I am aware that this is a ramble, without conclusion. In part this is because I simply don't know enough - enough political history, enough political theory, enough political present - to come to any conclusions[6]. And in part it's because I'm not sure there are any conclusions available. If forced to make a prediction, I think my tentative one would be: things will continue to change gradually at the bottom and in practice, and less so at the top and in theory. I think there probably will come a point when the current system cracks under the contradictions; but with the potential global political/economic changes we're facing, it's far from clear how inevitable that is, or whether it'll be overtaken by other things.

[0] A side-note: last time I headed off to Foreign for any length of time was India in 2002, and I didn't take a phone or Walkman (this was pre-MP3 player, or at least pre-me-having-MP3 -player), as I was concerned about waving Western tech around, inviting theft, etc etc. This time, phones & MP3 players, or possibly phones that are MP3 players, are ubiquitous. I'm sure this isn't entirely true in, say, rural Chinese villages or similar, but it's a very obvious change nevertheless.
[1] At least it does until you've nationalised enough banks. Man, that is all very weird.
[2] Well. For "might" read "would", as at least some of you will know from bitter personal experience ;-)
[3] Which I would strongly recommend. I gather that his book "A Bright Shining Lie", about the US & the Vietnam War (which he covered extensively at the time as an on-the-ground journalist in the South), is famous, & after reading this one I intend to locate & read it. "Two Cities" is about him returning to Hanoi & Saigon in 1989, and the changes and lack of changes that he saw.
[4] One of the great things about taking the train - you get to see things!
[5] I also made many interesting observations about field/plot shapes & how this relates to hand-cultivation! Which I will refrain from sharing with people who aren't interested i.e. nearly everyone, I expect.
[6] Reading suggestions welcome; and I promise that this is the last footnote.
juliet: (round the world)
(Disclaimer in advance: this following is largely speculation/rambling on my part based on very little direct experience and similarly little information. Factual correction more than welcome, as well as any other thoughts generally.)

Also it got a bit long )

I am aware that this is a ramble, without conclusion. In part this is because I simply don't know enough - enough political history, enough political theory, enough political present - to come to any conclusions[6]. And in part it's because I'm not sure there are any conclusions available. If forced to make a prediction, I think my tentative one would be: things will continue to change gradually at the bottom and in practice, and less so at the top and in theory. I think there probably will come a point when the current system cracks under the contradictions; but with the potential global political/economic changes we're facing, it's far from clear how inevitable that is, or whether it'll be overtaken by other things.

[0] A side-note: last time I headed off to Foreign for any length of time was India in 2002, and I didn't take a phone or Walkman (this was pre-MP3 player, or at least pre-me-having-MP3 -player), as I was concerned about waving Western tech around, inviting theft, etc etc. This time, phones & MP3 players, or possibly phones that are MP3 players, are ubiquitous. I'm sure this isn't entirely true in, say, rural Chinese villages or similar, but it's a very obvious change nevertheless.
[1] At least it does until you've nationalised enough banks. Man, that is all very weird.
[2] Well. For "might" read "would", as at least some of you will know from bitter personal experience ;-)
[3] Which I would strongly recommend. I gather that his book "A Bright Shining Lie", about the US & the Vietnam War (which he covered extensively at the time as an on-the-ground journalist in the South), is famous, & after reading this one I intend to locate & read it. "Two Cities" is about him returning to Hanoi & Saigon in 1989, and the changes and lack of changes that he saw.
[4] One of the great things about taking the train - you get to see things!
[5] I also made many interesting observations about field/plot shapes & how this relates to hand-cultivation! Which I will refrain from sharing with people who aren't interested i.e. nearly everyone, I expect.
[6] Reading suggestions welcome; and I promise that this is the last footnote.

Burma

Sep. 28th, 2007 11:18 am
juliet: Avatar of me with blue hair & jeans (blue hair jeans avatar)
[livejournal.com profile] bootpunk said that even as an atheist, it seems particularly horrifying to see monks being beaten up and shot. The whole thing is horrifying, though. And the way that things are being closed down within Burma now (phone lines cut, internet cut, people being searched for mobile phones and cameras, international mobile calls tracked) is increasingly worrying.

The Burma Campaign UK has links for you to contact the EU President (via the Portugese Embassy), and Gordon Brown. There's also contact details for the various Burmese embassies here. The email addresses for the UK, Canada, and France definitely don't work; no bounce message yet from Australia or the US. (I will write to the UK instead. I thought of phoning but I really don't know what I'd say on the phone. "Press one to protest about the current crackdown on peaceful protest"?).

Will it do any good? Fvck knows. Amnesty maintain that international pressure does work, in general. And not doing it definitely won't do any good.

Burma

Sep. 28th, 2007 11:18 am
juliet: Avatar of me with blue hair & jeans (blue hair jeans avatar)
[livejournal.com profile] bootpunk said that even as an atheist, it seems particularly horrifying to see monks being beaten up and shot. The whole thing is horrifying, though. And the way that things are being closed down within Burma now (phone lines cut, internet cut, people being searched for mobile phones and cameras, international mobile calls tracked) is increasingly worrying.

The Burma Campaign UK has links for you to contact the EU President (via the Portugese Embassy), and Gordon Brown. There's also contact details for the various Burmese embassies here. The email addresses for the UK, Canada, and France definitely don't work; no bounce message yet from Australia or the US. (I will write to the UK instead. I thought of phoning but I really don't know what I'd say on the phone. "Press one to protest about the current crackdown on peaceful protest"?).

Will it do any good? Fvck knows. Amnesty maintain that international pressure does work, in general. And not doing it definitely won't do any good.
juliet: The towers at Canary Wharf seen from Staves Hill in Bermondsey (london wharf)
Tories want to give council tenants money to buy in the private sector - how, exactly, do they get from "social housing as a transitory stage" to "transforming council estates so that people have a sense of local pride and ownership"? Surely the effect would be exactly the opposite - no impetus to care about the local surroundings because you wouldn't expect to be there long?

ION: date I received "please pay us money" letter from LSBU: Fri 31 Aug (after 5pm so could not phone immediately). Date money is due: Tue 4 Sep. Number of times I have so far phoned, got answerphone, and left my number, name, student number, etc (as per request on answerphone): 3. Number of times I have been called back: 0.

(If they refuse to give me my discount for paying on time because of this I will be Very Very Cross Indeed.)

Many more pedestrians than average in Hyde Park. It would be nice if some of them kept up the walking when the tubes return...
juliet: The towers at Canary Wharf seen from Staves Hill in Bermondsey (london wharf)
Tories want to give council tenants money to buy in the private sector - how, exactly, do they get from "social housing as a transitory stage" to "transforming council estates so that people have a sense of local pride and ownership"? Surely the effect would be exactly the opposite - no impetus to care about the local surroundings because you wouldn't expect to be there long?

ION: date I received "please pay us money" letter from LSBU: Fri 31 Aug (after 5pm so could not phone immediately). Date money is due: Tue 4 Sep. Number of times I have so far phoned, got answerphone, and left my number, name, student number, etc (as per request on answerphone): 3. Number of times I have been called back: 0.

(If they refuse to give me my discount for paying on time because of this I will be Very Very Cross Indeed.)

Many more pedestrians than average in Hyde Park. It would be nice if some of them kept up the walking when the tubes return...

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    12 3
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Tags

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags