juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Juliet Kemp.

Eastercon was fabulous, and I may yet do a writeup post, but for now, I have many recs to extract from my scribbled notes. (NB I have not yet read any of these; things I had already read I didn’t generally write down.)


LGBT to QUILTBAG panel:



  • “Not Your Sidekick” — C. B. Lee

  • “A Rational Arrangement” — L. Rowyn

  • “Hunger Makes the Wolf” — Alex Wells (cyberpunk)

  • The Raven Cycle — Maggie Stiefvater (YA, queer relationships)

  • “The House of Shattered Wings” — Aliette de Bodard

  • General recs: Uncanny Magazine, Tor.com, Lethe Press


Women of Star Wars panel:



  • “The Things I Would Tell You” — Muslim women anthology


Hamilton lecture:



Romance, Mystery, and Fantasy panel


(plus some recs from the bar afterwards. Some of these are non-SFF romance.)



  • Obsidian and Blood series — think this may have meant “Ivory and Bone” and “Obsidian and Stars” — Julie Eshbough

  • “Daughter of Smoke and Bone” — Laini Taylor

  • “Behind Her Eyes” — Sarah Pinborough

  • “Hold Me” — Courtney Milan

  • "Hold" -- Rachel Davidson Lee

  • Cosy witch mysteries!

  • Heather Rose Jones (published by Bella Books)

  • “Don’t Feed The Trolls” — Erica Kudisch

  • “Rollergirl” — Vanessa North

  • “The Art Of Three” — Racheline Maltese & Erin McRae

  • “Storm Season” — Pene Henson

  • “The Ultra-Fabulous Glitter Squadron Saves The World” — A. C. Wise

  • “Hurricane Heels” — Isabel Yap

  • Neville/Hermione/Luna fic generally (must check AO3 tag 🙂 )


Fandom and Theatre panel



  • Team Starkid — on YouTube

  • Smash — TV show about backstage

  • Slings and Arrows — TV show about actors


Misc other recs



  • “At The End Of The Day” — Claire North

  • “The End of Days” — Jenny Erpenbeck

  • “Cities in Flight” — James Blish

  • “Meg and Linus” — Hanna Nowinski

  • “Every Heart A Doorway” — Seanan McGuire


So, uh, that should keep me going.

juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Look what arrived in the post for me!

Furthest Tales of the City

Stories by some splendid writers including me:

Furthest Tales of the City contents

I haven’t read it yet as it only arrived yesterday, but am greatly looking forward to it. Some of the titles look especially interesting, but I may have to start with Helen Angove’s story.

(Buy it here from the publishers, Obverse Books, in paperback or ebook form.)

juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Look what came through the letterbox yesterday!

Book cover: Faction Paradox, "Liberating Earth"

A brand new Faction Paradox collection, featuring a story by me, among eight others. I haven’t yet read the others, as it only arrived yesterday, but I am greatly looking forward to them; especially the frame story by Kate Orman.

Available now from Obverse Books (hardback) or on Kindle.

juliet: Avatar of me with blue hair & jeans (blue hair jeans avatar)
My investigation in November into "taking more time off" was positive in that I felt better for it, and have tentatively concluded I should do more of that. (Where "that" is "having at least some time where I am not staring down a to-do list".) Actually doing it, as ever, proves harder. I'm experimenting now with ways to fit more work achieved into work days and thus have more time off. As Leon gets bigger (and so doesn't demand me as often) in theory this should be easier as I can be less interrupted and therefore more efficient. I am also hoping that lovely new noise-cancelling headphones will help a bit with focus (rather than, say, listening to everything else that's happening in the house at the same time.)

Read more... )
juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Current writing news: Iris Wildthyme of Mars (in which I have a story) is now out from Obverse Press in ebook form and available for preorder (pub date 30 Sept) in dead tree form. The cover art is awesome.

Iris Wildthyme of Mars FrontCover

I haven’t read my copy yet (I am in the throes of a Dorothy L. Sayers re-read; previous evidence suggests that it is useless even trying to extract myself before I reach the end) but am greatly looking forward to it. There are plenty of fine authors in there.

Philip Purser-Hallard, the editor, is also editor of another new Obverse collection, Tales of the Great Detectives (ebook or dead tree pre-order (30 Sept again)). So you might do well to read that one too (as I will be doing) (dammit, I need to read faster).

juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Hurrah, another story out.

http://www.fictionmagazines.com/shop/realm-issues/new-realm-vol-02-08/

(Only just realised this, despite having looked before, due to their website being a bit counter-intuitive.)

In other news, I have begun revising the novel I’m working on at the moment. It is a bit like trying to put together a really big jigsaw puzzle in several dimensions, when you keep discovering that some of the pieces are missing, and other pieces that aren’t missing are actually from another puzzle altogether.

juliet: (glasto love)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

I have a couple of stories out in various places right now, should you be interested:

  • “The Loyal Dragon” in kids’ (age range 9-17) SFF magazine FrostFire Worlds (May 2014 issue). It has a dragon in it! (I have a long-term fondness for dragons.) Only available in print, and I suspect UK shipping will be expensive.
  • “Breaking Free” in Outposts of Beyond (July 2014 issue, also print only). This is set in the same world as my story ‘Blocking’ (published in Strange Bedfellows).
  • And forthcoming sometime soon in New Realms, “A Gift of Memory”, about gifts, trust, and mistakes made and forgotten.

In other news, I spent much of the last couple of weeks camping in fields. Firstly with a bunch of unschooling types down in Dorset (just me and Leon). Which was lovely, apart from the bit where Leon came down with a stomach bug. (In a tent. Not fun.) Still, at least the weather was good.

Then there was Glastonbury! For the 12th time for me (since 1997) and the 2nd for Leon. The weather was not so good there (intermittent rain, but I’ve certainly been there in much worse conditions) but the festival was as ever fantastic regardless of a bit of mud and damp. Leon was particularly keen on the Kidzfield, and on Shangri-Heaven early on Sunday night, where there were angels with bubbles and lots of running around space. Photos here.

juliet: Shot of my bookshelves at home (books)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

The Goblin Emperor, by Katherine Addison, has been on my to-read list for a while. This is partly due to seeing generally positive things about it in many places, and partly because Katherine Addison was previously known as Sarah Monette. Sarah Monette wrote Melusine, which I read and thoroughly enjoyed, but by the time I discovered this, the remaining three novels in the series were annoyingly out of print.* The Goblin Emperor finally got bumped up to the top of the list after reading this review by Justin Landon, which mentioned both that it’s a work of genius, and, more importantly, that the protagonist, Maia, is actually nice.

As Landon observes, good-person protagonists are an increasing rarity in spec-fic. One of the other books I read recently was God’s War (Bel Dame Apocrypha #1), by Kameron Hurley. It too, in a different way, is an excellent book, but it’s a grim read, and protagonist Nyx is a long way from any descriptor like “nice” or “good”. I freely admit that I prefer my reading matter a bit on the positive side, and recently that seems to have been in short supply.

Anyway. I started out on The Goblin Emperor, and I fell in love, ooh, about three pages in. Maybe two. I galloped greedily and joyously through the first 3/4 of it, and then I slowed way down in the despairing knowledge that it was going to run out, and there are no sequels or anything (yet? please let it be ‘yet’). Then I did come to the end, and I stared thoughtfully at my Kindle, and then I hit the “go to start” button and I read it all over again. I managed not to read it a third time after that, but it was a close-run thing.

For a more thorough review, try Strange Horizons or The Book Smugglers or Tor (spoiler: they all loved it too). But what did I love about it? I loved the detailed world-building (airships and court politics and social structures and all the rest of it), and the gradual reveal of new parts and new aspects to existing parts. It’s beautifully handled, with confusion created and resolved at just the right rate. I loved Maia, the protagonist. (I really loved Maia.) He is, as Landon said, genuinely a good person. Not a perfect person; but someone trying to do their best, trying to do good in the world. I loved the racial and gender politics; again, beautifully and lightly handled. I loved the court politics and the wonderfully-observed government structures. I loved the interpersonal relationships. I also loved that it didn’t go for the “race to the grim” option; bad things happen, but they don’t feel gratuitous, and they don’t feel like the author is trying to demonstrate how TOUGH they are**.

Above everything else, I loved the feel of it; as several of the reviewers above mention, it is a warm, satisfying book that left me feeling better about the world.

I cannot recommend this highly enough, if you’re remotely into fantasy. And I really, desperately hope that there’s a sequel. In the meantime, I might just have to read it again.

* After reading this book, I now finally have them all on their way second-hand.
** I have this beef with quite a few recent spec-fic novels.

juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

On a wall at the Bishopsgate Institute today, while visiting the London Radical Bookfair, I saw a quote from Voltaire:

“Twenty-volume folios will never make a revolution. It is the little pocket pamphlets that are to be feared.”

Inside the hall, folios (albeit only single-volume) were piled high on booksellers’ tables. Weighty, academic books with lots of long words. Now, I have nothing against academic books with long words (I no longer buy them, because I don’t read them*, but I have nothing against them), but Voltaire, I think, had a point. Rare is the currently-unconvinced individual whose mind will be changed by this stuff. I suppose attendees at the London Radical Bookfair are likely to be the already-converted, so perhaps the booksellers simply know their market. But I’m their market too (aren’t I?) and I wasn’t buying.

Where, too, was the fiction? Long or short. Perhaps I am biased in my faith that stories can change the world; but if they can, no one here was doing much to try that out.

(Honourable exception: the Letterbox Library, who stock kids’ books but no adult. And I did see a bit of poetry. I even bought some, along with something which claims to be a mixture of local history, folklore, and weird fiction, partly because I liked what I read of it, and partly out of relief that it was there at all.)

Upstairs were the zines. Plenty of pamphlets here; beautiful ones, too. And yet — what happened to the words? I’m sure zines used to have a mixture: plenty of just-word stuff, some half-and-half, some comic-style graphical storytelling, some straight art. Everything I saw on Saturday was heavy on the graphics end of things. Gorgeous, but word-light. Which is fine (if not my thing), but still — where have the words gone?

Online, possibly. Maybe words are better suited to screens; maybe artists have more incentive to create physical objects with their art. It seems faintly unsatisfying to me – why shouldn’t writers** want or get to create physical things too? Do the readers of plain words just not want physical things? Or is this the reflection of the ebook era?

After all, when it comes to getting the word out there, online has the edge, no question. If Voltaire were writing now, his pamphlets would be blogs. Perhaps, then, that is the explanation. The pamphlets and words and even the fiction live online, and it is the art and the long, deeply academic works that still need a physical form. Maybe that is a good thing, or at any rate not a bad one; maybe it is neither good nor bad, but just a thing.

And yet, I do wish that I’d been able to come away with my bag full of short stories and long ones and pamphlet-sized calls to action.

* The first anarchist bookfair I went to was in San Francisco, in 1999. I bought a compendium of the zine Temp Slave, and a book of anarchist essays. Temp Slave is dog-eared at the corners, and undoubtedly affected my attitude to the world of work; the anarchist essays remain unread.
** Non-artist writers, I mean, who do not also want to draw.

juliet: My laptop on my desk in Sydney (freelance laptop)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

The author list for “Iris Wildthyme of Mars” (ed Philip Purser-Hallard), due out this summer from Obverse Books, was announced this week, and I am on it!

Iris is a splendid character to write, and I enjoyed putting the story together. (Writing for me often feels like that; like locking pieces of idea into one another to create a finished structure. I may be influenced in this notion by time recently spent with Duplo blocks.) It even has a permaculture genesis…

I’m looking forward to reading the other stories (I’ve already read a first draft of one of them, and it was great; and I’m familiar with previous work from several of the other authors), and to the book coming out. Watch this space, and so on.

juliet: (Default)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

The anthology Strange Bedfellows, from Bundoran Press, is on sale now (wherever books are sold, and also specifically direct from the publisher or from Amazon UK). My story Blocking features it.

It’s an anthology of specifically political SF, from a broad range of political perspectives. My story concerns spacefaring anarchists (as may not be terribly surprising to anyone who is familiar with my political biases), and the making of decisions, personal and collective. There’s a review of the book as a whole over on Black Gate. I’ve been reading the rest of the stories (not quite all done yet as my author copy only arrived recently) and it’s a thought-provoking read all round.>

juliet: (Default)
I hate editing. (She says, 8 pages down, 16 to go. Deadline Monday, which really means today or at most tomorrow for practical reasons.)

I keep not blogging here, because I haven't blogged here, because (insert customary spiel re catching up and not feeling able to catch up and...). I blog over there sometimes and it propagates magically over here, but I am less inclined to write personal-ish posts there.

Anyway! Stuff! Things! Leon is 2, using more and more complicated language structures (pronouns are very tricky), and obsessed with the written word (with particular reference to tube station names). I am writing about computer history for Linux Voice which is fascinating and great fun; trying to write more fiction; and doing more permaculture work. Yesterday I gave a talk at the Edible Gardens Show, which I think went OK, and will probably blog about next week. Bloody terrifying though; it's the first time I've spoken in public for years&years. I doubtless talked too fast.

Time is elusive. I am sure there used to be more of it. Or I used it better? (Every time I angst about this I remind myself that I used to not have a kid, and children are kind of time-sinks. In a good way, mostly.)

I am making more things, though. Sewing especially. I still love knitting, but sewing is quicker.

So. Things. Misc. There you go.
juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Twisted Boulevard (featuring ME) now available from Amazon UK. (As far as I know this is the only UK online retailer; although your local indie bookshop ought to be able to order it in for you.)

(I still haven’t seen my contributor copy, but looking forward to reading it when I do.)

In other news, I have had a lovely weekend up in Manchester. Leon was particularly fond of this train, where by “particularly fond of” I mean “refused to get off until it stopped running for the day”. After that there were ducks, and vegan curry; an excellent day all round.

This week: lots of writing to be done. Story to edit for another forthcoming anthology; novel to work on; Linux Voice article to finish.

juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Black and white photo of urban street, hotel or similar in the background with a lit-up canopy, silhouette figure in foreground sitting on a low pillar. "Twisted Boulevard" in red down the left, and "Edited by Angela Charmaine Craig" at bottom.

Cover for Twisted Boulevard

Twisted Boulevard, the urban fantasy anthology from Elektrik Milk Bath Press in which I have a story, is now available. They will do international shipping there, but it should also be available from Amazon UK in a week or so. (For some reason there is always a delay, apparently.)

Over on writer Gregory L. Norris’ blog, a few of the writers in the anthology (including me) have shared a little snippet of what’s behind their stories.

I am looking forward to receiving my own copy soon and getting to read the other stories.

(In unrelated news, I really wish I knew why my laptop was running quite so slowly. It is most annoying.)

Stories!

Nov. 24th, 2013 08:36 pm
juliet: (waveform tree)

Mirrored from Twisting Vines.

Slightly belatedly, I have a story, “A Dangerous Magic”, in Silver Blade issue 20.

I also have a story, “Blocking”, forthcoming in Strange Bedfellows from Bundoran Press. That won’t be out until April 2014 but I am greatly looking forward to it.

(There are another couple of stories on their way which I don’t think have been formally announced yet so I won’t mention. But I am very excited about them too.)

juliet: My laptop on my desk in Sydney (freelance laptop)
Tales of the City (OQ 2.1 on that page) is now out in ebook form. The dead-tree version is due out at the end of next week.

There are two reviews available on the Obverse Books site, both of which are pleasingly positive.
juliet: (Default)
I have a story out in issue 3 of the Journal of Unlikely Entemology! It has bugs in.

I have been meaning to do a proper baby-update for ages; this is not it. He is currently asleep on the sofa next to me, having been asleep (bar two snoozy feeds) since 11 this morning. This is Unusual, but as he spent most of yesterday feeding, I conclude that this is the post-growth-spurt rest. It's hard work, growing. He is generally delightful in all ways and has just started being *interested in the world* (who knew that the panels on the wall at Westminster tube station were so TOTALLY AWESOME? They have DOTS, you see. MANY DOTS.). As 11wk old babies go, he sleeps pretty well, but the sleep dep is nevertheless beginning to catch up with me a bit. Of course, despite this, I am spending this unexpected nap catching up with my to-do list rather than eg sleeping, because I am an fule.
juliet: (Default)
The splendid "Tales of the City", Obverse Quarterly Year 2 Book 2, is now available for pre-order (a little way down that page) for £9.99. (Or you can subscribe to the whole year's worth of books for £28 on the same page.) That's for the paperback; ebook will be available but can't be pre-ordered.

All the stories are great, which I know because I got to read it in advance due to one of them being mine. They're all set in the City of the Saved, the description of which I shall pinch from the pre-order page:

"Beyond the end of the universe exists a city the size of a galaxy, packed with every human being that ever lived, from the first Australopithecus to the last post-human, resurrected in a city in which nobody can die...or rather, that used to be the case."

A couple of trailers are available on the blog of the editor, Phil Purser-Hallard: for Blair Bidmead's story and for Elizabeth Evershed's story.

In other news, Leon is doing splendidly and if I'm not mistaken, is about to wake up and demand feeding...
juliet: Part of a Pollock artwork in the Tate (art - pollock)
I have my first published story out in this anthology, now out in ebook & at 15% off! Am inordinately excited :) I've been reading the other stories as well, now that I've got my contributor's copy, and can whole-heartedly recommend the whole book.

"Magic that detects crime, magic that heals, magic that destroys: all this and more and in hands of queer women who use their powers to shape their worlds and their destinies."

Salt Water

Sep. 16th, 2010 12:28 pm
juliet: Marna, me, and Pete, in our swimming kit, walking down the beach somewhere on the South Coast  (swimming in the sea)
I have a short story, 'Salt Water', in this month's issue of Eclectic Flash. Available for free online, or as a hardcopy from Lulu.

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